Why Hasn’t The Stock Market Crashed Yet? Joe?

Chicken Smith View:

Market CorrectionAs our markets keep trying to correct themselves (ie, come down off their high horse), there are major players in the system who are constantly propping up the markets with unnecessary and undue infusions of capital. Among these players are the Federal Reserve, corporations, foreign investors, and an ever growing group of individual investors — your average Joe.

It used to be that the majority of traders were, to a large extent, all professionals. In today’s financial markets, that no longer seems to be the case. Given the right tools, every Joe-six-pack can be a day trader.

What does this translate into? Potentially, a bunch of novices could be keeping (or at least helping to keep) our financial markets afloat. Every Tom, Dick and Harry now has a brokerage account or three, and the problem is that they all know just enough to make them think their “buy low, sell high” strategy combined with their computer savvy (so called “smart” trading software) will keep them out of trouble. They’re wrong.

The idea is simple; buy when prices are at their lowest and sell when prices are at their highest. However, this simple notion assumes one knows when something is at its lowest or highest price in real time. Retrospectively, we can all check the charts and see when something peaked or bottomed, but while its happening, we simply just don’t know, the price of a stock can climb or fall dramatically in a matter of minutes if not seconds.

The very concept that the “buying low and selling high” strategy will produce great returns is fraught with error, as one should never base their investments on price alone.

Even seasoned professional investors will sometimes fall for the herd mentality and begin following the bulls and buying when the markets are taking a tumble (also known as everything being “on sale”). Something that has, coincidentally, been occurring a lot lately. So it’s not too difficult to see how Tom, Dick & Harry can easily fall for it as well.

With online brokerages and local banks offering $7, $4 and even free online trades, it is now easier than ever to be a day trader, even if you don’t know a single thing about stocks or short term capital gains.

But that’s not enough to discourage your average Joe, who is just itching to jump in the stock market game, especially since he was one of the fortunate to be watching TV at 3am on a Sunday morning and plunked down hundreds of dollars for an investor kit that included “smart” trading software. Which, by the way, if properly configured, can do all the thinking for him… and we all know how much thought Joe wants to put into this.

DJIA Jul. to Dec. 2007

Recently, whenever the Dow Jones Industrial Average Index (DJI) takes a 100 point nose-dive, it seems the very next day there is a 100 point jump. And vice-versa. So, is this really the natural and logical effect of a market driven by a bunch of professional traders? Or should the question really be: Just how many “Joes” are out there?

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